неделя, 31 май 2015 г.

Report : Military waste and the environment


Report | Doc. 12354 | 06 August 2010

Military waste and the environment


(Former) Committee on the Environment, Agriculture and Local and Regional Affairs
Rapporteur : Mr Latchezar TOSHEV, Bulgaria, EPP/CD
Origin - Reference to the committee: Doc. 11462, Reference 3404 of 21 January 2008. 2010 - November Standing Committee

Summary

The Assembly’s Committee on the Environment, Agriculture and Local and Regional Affairs deplores the fact that the use and management of military waste, which represents a significant threat to the environment, comes under military secrecy. Most of this waste, which has moreover caused human and environmental damage in the last few years, is still chemically active and may bring about disasters on a European scale.
Consequently, the Assembly should encourage the Council of Europe member states to waive the confidentiality of information about military waste, where such confidentiality still exists. It should also invite the member states to create and implement a common European policy and methodology for military waste management and to consider setting up a body with the purpose, in particular, of co-ordinating and supervising national actions.

A. Draft resolution


1. The production of weapons used in war, their detonation and the eventual storage of the hazardous material in military waste disposal sites could cause serious environmental problems. The utilisation and management of military waste is an issue that needs to be addressed by the Council of Europe member states as a serious environmental problem.
2. Many substances present in military waste are still active and can cause problems for nature and human health. Furthermore, only recently evidence has shown that the exposure to detonated material can have disastrous effects. Unfortunately, these problems cannot be solved by simply displacing stored waste, ignoring the dangers of abandoned arsenals or implementing standards on a country-by-country basis.
3. During the last two decades, about ten serious incidents involving military waste were reported, all of which resulted in victims, environmental damage and expense for repairing the damage caused. Such serious incidents affect not only the states in question, but go beyond their frontiers and are in fact a common European problem.
4. Important quantities of weapons dating from the First and Second World Wars and the Cold War are still stored by the military, but competition in weapon production and rapid technological developments have resulted in most of these weapons becoming obsolete.
5. In a special category of hazardous military waste are weapons that have been dumped on the seabed in vast quantities and in some cases on the river beds. Most of this waste is still chemically active and can cause serious environmental problems. The Parliamentary Assembly has already dealt with this particular issue in its Resolution 1612 (2008) on chemical munitions dumped in the Baltic Sea.
6. The Assembly consequently calls upon member states to lift confidentiality on information about military waste, where such confidentiality still exists.
7. In the light of the above, and especially with regard to the negative effects on the environment, the Assembly believes that military waste has become a common problem in all European countries.
8. The Assembly therefore invites the Council of Europe member states to:
8.1. create and implement a common European policy and methodology for military waste management, which also addresses means of recycling a part of this military waste, bearing in mind the shortage of resources and the need for sustainable development;
8.2. adopt mutually acceptable regulations on freedom of information on disposal of military waste in Europe and guarantee the availability of information on the types of waste material and the lifting of any confidentiality in this respect;
8.3. consider creating a new international or European body and European financial instrument to deal with the issue and to co-ordinate the efforts of member states. Such an institution could support member states that face serious difficulties in solving their problem, co-operate with European neighbouring countries on utilisation of their military waste, and establish a joint control mechanism;
8.4. initiate co-operation in this respect with NATO member states, as well with those Council of Europe member states that are not members of NATO, with a view to harmonising policies and methodologies on utilisation of military waste.

B. Draft recommendation


1. The Parliamentary Assembly, referring to its Resolution … (2010) on military waste and the environment, reiterates that military waste is a common problem in all European countries.
2. It consequently calls on states to take the necessary steps to set up inter-state co-operation and to ensure greater transparency, particularly where the communication of information is concerned.
3. The Assembly also recommends that the Committee of Ministers draft a set of guidelines to encourage member and non-member states to adopt and implement co-ordinated strategies on dealing with military waste, as called for in the aforementioned resolution.

C. Explanatory memorandum by Mr Toshev, rapporteur

(open)

1. Introduction

1. The origin of this report is the motion for a resolution (Doc. 11462) on military waste and the environment, tabled by Mr Ivan Ivanov and others.
2. In order to gather background information for the report, the Committee on the Environment, Agriculture and Local and Regional Affairs organised a hearing in Paris on 23 November 2009. At this hearing, the committee heard a presentation by Lt Colonel Dr Nikolay Nikolov from the Bulgarian Ministry of Defence, who is an expert on problems related to military waste.
3. In December 2009, a questionnaire was distributed to the member states with the following questions:
  • What kind and how much non-utilised military waste is stored on the territory of your state?
  • Is there any public information as to where military waste (including radioactive, if any) is stored?
  • If so, does it include disposal sites on the bed of water basins or deep below ground level?
  • Do you co-operate with other states or with international institutions in order to solve the environmental problems raised by military waste management?
  • Is there any specific legislation concerning this issue?
4. Replies were received from 20 states (Andorra, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Estonia, Georgia, Germany, Greece, the Netherlands, Hungary, Italy, Lithuania, Poland, Portugal, Serbia, Slovak Republic, Slovenia, “the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia” and Turkey).
5. Most of the replies about military waste disposal were not very informative, which explains the lack of available information on the issue.
6. Nine of those states that replied reported that they had legislation on the issue. Five states reported that they were co-operating with other states or institutions in solving the problems of military waste. It is very disappointing that 27 states did not provide any information.
7. This lack of information made it impossible to make a comparative study on the legislation of the Council of Europe member states on this issue, although this had been the rapporteur’s initial intention.
8. A very precise reply, which was highly appreciated by the rapporteur, was provided by Germany.
9. The committee authorised a visit of the rapporteur and the secretary of the committee to NATO Headquarters in Brussels. Due to transport complications, the meeting in NATO had to be held in the absence of the rapporteur. The secretary of the committee nevertheless met the following persons:
  • Mr Henrik Dam, Head of JAIS (Joint Armaments and Industry Section, Defence Investment Division);
  • Mr Osman Tasman, Head of the Land Armaments Unit, JAIS;
  • Lt Col Filip Martel, Vice-Chairman of CNAD (Conference of National Armament Directors) Ammunition Safety Group – Subgroup 5 on Logistic Storage and Disposal;
  • Ms Marie-Claire Mortier, secretary.
10. He was given the following information:
11. The topic of “military waste” is extremely vast. It would be appropriate to focus on a single aspect, namely conventional ammunition. This would leave aside, of course, nuclear and chemical ammunition.
12. NATO itself has prepared a document on the disposal of conventional ammunition. The paper reviews the best disposal techniques, the “best practices”, with a view to identifying them and spreading knowledge of them (the problems being similar everywhere, one should avoid “reinventing the wheel”).
13. The geographical area covered by the Council of Europe roughly coincides with that covered by NATO’s Partnership for Peace programme.
14. Upon learning that the rapporteur intended to make a study visit to Ukraine, the interlocutors informed the secretary of the committee that Ukraine had a true problem with “leftover ammunition”. NATO supports Ukraine in dealing with this issue through NAMSA expertise (NATO Maintenance and Supply Agency, which has an office in Kyiv). NAMSA is working on disposal contracts for both ammunition and weapons (using only environmental friendly techniques).

1.1. The use of ammunition

15. Lead bullets should be prohibited because of the lead pollution due to firing.
16. Depleted uranium bullets are to be considered as “conventional” ammunition. There are discussions as to whether or not depleted uranium bullets were the cause of soldiers’ sicknesses during the Gulf War.
17. Other discussions concern the cleaning up of battlefields.
18. Cluster ammunition is banned by the Oslo Convention on Cluster Munitions.

1.2. The storage of ammunition

19. Stored ammunition represents a permanent and serious threat to the environment; the question is not “if” it will blow up but “when” it will blow up. That is why ammunition should not be stored close to (or in) residential areas.

1.3. The disposal of ammunition

20. It is very expensive to dispose of ammunition, but, if it is not properly disposed of, it will eventually blow up.

1.4. The transport of ammunition

21. For the transport of ammunition, civil regulations are still in use (which is regrettable).
22. Among questions to be raised could be the following one: for the destruction of conventional ammunition, is burning in the open air still an acceptable solution? A risk analysis should be able to give the answer.
23. Two documents would have been useful in the work on this report:
  • STANAG 2510: “Waste management for NATO military activities”;
  • STANAG 2545: “NATO glossary on environmental protection”. (STANAG = Standardisation Agreement)
However, these documents could not be given to civilians; they could only obtained by request from a national representation to NATO.
24. In this situation, it was difficult for the rapporteur to prepare a very profound analysis of the situation. Despite his intention that the report be based on information officially provided by member states, a significant part of the sources for the preparation of this report were publications in the media or reports by NGOs.

2. Production and manufacturing consequences

25. Warfare not only elicits large-scale casualties and devastated landscapes, but it also leaves a wake of other serious consequences, which may plague a country long after political problems are resolved. The production of weapons used in war, their detonation and the eventual storage of the hazardous materials involved must be addressed. Many of the substances in military waste are still active and could cause problems for the environment and human health.
26. Furthermore, only recently has evidence shown the long-term effects of exposure to detonated materials, which have proven to be very dangerous. Simply displacing stored waste, ignoring the dangers of abandoned arsenals, or implementing standards on a country-by-country basis will fail to adequately address these challenges. In the last decades, about 10 incidents involving military waste were reported – in Uzbekistan, Albania, Bulgaria, Russia, France, Ukraine, etc. There have been victims, environmental damage and expenses to cover the important problems caused, which have been serious.
27. Important quantities of weapons from the First and Second World Wars and the Cold War are still stored by the military, but competition in weapon production during the Cold War and rapid technological developments have resulted in most of these weapons becoming obsolete.

3. Examples of data collected during the preparation of the report

28. According to the data collected, there are around 2.5 million tonnes of military waste stored in Ukraine since the Soviet era, in about 6 000 storage sites. Part of this military waste is stored without any particular precautionary measures.
29. Special attention should be paid to the problem of burial of radioactive waste.
30. There is a state programme on the utilisation of non-necessary armaments in Ukraine, which covers the period from 2006 to 2017, and there are several regulations concerning practical proceedings for the utilisation and handling of armaments. Ukraine needs help to resolve the problems it has with military waste.
31. Unfortunately, the rapporteur was not able to visit Ukraine to study the situation in more depth. Our data provides information about a series of explosions and incidents between 2004 and 2006 in the Novobohdanivka arsenal. There are reasons to believe that the situation of military waste management and utilisation in Ukraine remains serious and that not much progress has been achieved in the meantime. One of the reasons for this complicated situation is the lack of financial resources to address this problem.
32. In Moldova, at the Cobasna station, on the territory of Transnistria, around 20 000 tonnes of arms and ammunition are stored. No more data was available about this case. 
33. An OSCE report of 2007 indicates that in Belarus the utilisation of military waste has caused serious environmental problems, including the need for local authorities to clean up a territory of around 300 000 hectares, the sites of former military bases.
34. According to a paper by Peter Szyszlo, the Russian Yablokov Commission has estimated that, after 1965, the Soviet Union dumped a total of 2.5 million curies of contained and discharged radioactive waste into the ocean – including 16 nuclear submarine and nuclear ice-breaker reactors – in the gulfs near Novaja Zemlja. The same paper stated that between 1964 and 1991, between 11 000 and 17 000 containers of liquid and solid radioactive waste were dumped in the same region. Some of the containers were punctured to facilitate sinking. The areas where this highly dangerous disposal method was used during the Soviet times, causing a risk of radioactive pollution, are, according to this paper, the Barents and Kara seas and the area surrounding Novaja Zemlja. This “nuclear graveyard”, says Peter Szyszlo, was “not only for radioactive waste but also for reactors, decommissioned nuclear-powered vessels and more recently dismantled nuclear weapons”.
35. The rapporteur would like to connect this information with the information about the situation in the Arctic region, provided by the Norwegian authorities during the hearing organised by the Committee on the Environment, Regional Planning and Local Authorities in Tromsø in 1999.
36. The rapporteur considers that it would be of great importance and most welcome if the Russian Federation would accept to co-operate with the Council of Europe, the European Union and the United Nations in solving this problem, which is obviously not only a national one.
37. In the Russian Federation there are currently 27 legal texts regulating the utilisation of military waste, but not a single law on this issue has been adopted. There is a federal programme on the utilisation of armaments and military techniques, which was adopted in 2005 and is in force until the end of 2010. The goal of the programme is to decrease expenditure for storing unnecessary armaments by 70%. In the Russian Federation, there is also a federal law on military technical co-operation with other states, which includes the issue of the utilisation of armaments and military techniques.
38. There was no other information at the disposal of the rapporteur about the commitments of the Russian Federation to the solution of the problems raised by old military waste disposal sites and especially about waste dumped in water basins.
39. In the British newspaper the Independent on Sunday of 22 June 2008, an article by Jonathan Owen entitled “Soldiers dumped munitions with household waste”, reported on about 20 incidents of the dumping of military waste in Great Britain, calling it a “dangerous and highly unprofessional military habit”, subject to sanctions by the Health and Safety Executive and the Environmental Agency. The British House of Commons held a debate on military radioactive waste on 20 May 2008, where this particular issue was addressed.
40. Bulgaria has a national programme, adopted in 2004, for the utilisation and destruction of surplus ammunition on its territory. There are also four main sections of legislation that cover the issue of utilisation.
41. In 2003, there were 59 000 tonnes of surplus ammunition in Bulgaria. After the reform of the army, which in 2005 started to be transformed into a professional army, this quantity increased to 67 000 tonnes. In Bulgaria, there is currently a plan on military waste management, aimed at being fully implemented by 2015.
42. On 3 July 2008, near Sofia, there was a big explosion of surplus ammunition, which caused damage, but fortunately there were no victims.
43. Similar explosions of surplus ammunition took place on 15 March 2008 in the village of Gerdech, near Tirana in Albania, on 17 July 2008 in the missile-artillery warehouses near the town of Kagan in Uzbekistan, on 4 September 2009 in the factory Parvi Partizan near the town of Uzjice in Serbia, on 13 November 2009 in the Arsenal 31 warehouses near the town of Ulianovsk in the Russian Federation, etc.

4. Environmental and health effects of producing weapons

44. Environmental pollution resulting from the manufacturing of weapons and warfare materials is undoubtedly a global issue with which many countries are challenged. Whether by air, water, or soil contamination, the environmental problems caused by weapon production should be the subject of serious consideration, even though the consequences are not as immediately evident as the consequences of actual warfare. These problems are therefore often pushed aside as other seemingly more urgent problems are pushed to the forefront of the environmental debate.
45. The production of nuclear weapons releases carcinogenic and mutagenic materials such as plutonium, uranium, strontium, caesium, benzene, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), mercury and cyanide. These chemicals remain hazardous for thousands, some for tens of thousands, of years. Using the current methods of disposal, these materials are exposed to drinking water, groundwater and soil. Currently, the specific contaminant that has received most attention is perchlorate. Produced at a rate of several million pounds per annum, this chemical is a primary ingredient in propellant and has been used for decades for solid rocket propellant and the manufacturing of rockets and missiles. Perchlorate is easily dissolved and transported in water and has thus been found in drinking water and food products. This compound has been found to affect the thyroid gland and cause developmental delays.

5. Post-detonation emissions

46. Perhaps an even greater oversight in environmental discussions are the long-term effects of hazardous materials, which remain in war-torn countries long after troops have left. These environmental consequences may often be the most difficult to detect if no special attention is paid to this issue. Since the most evidently hazardous chemicals have only been a product of modern warfare, there are few case studies that can provide reliable research on this issue.

6. Hazardous military waste

47. For certain areas of eastern Europe, post-war environmental implications encompass several ecological sectors and continue to pose a grave threat to the water supply, air quality, and safety of the people who live there. Due to the previous Soviet occupation, these countries have been left with abandoned military bases, undetected weapons, hazardous waste and radioactive residue. Furthermore, these problems have been exacerbated by lax regulation. Today, Moldova alone faces the problem that it has to deal with 8 000 tonnes of toxic residues that are stored illegally and in a disorganised manner, leading, inter alia, to water contamination. According to the figures at our disposal, there are about 20 000 tonnes of arms and munitions, all stored in Transnistria, that are impossible to transport. An explosion of these munitions would undoubtedly lead to a humanitarian disaster. In Ukraine, 2.5 million tonnes of arms, munitions and military waste are lying unclaimed on a number of sites. Four of these sites include also buried radioactive residues. Moreover, 39% of used water is contaminated and 25% of it returns into the environment. Belarus is faced with the need to get rid of armaments left by the Soviet military, which are both radioactive and toxic and the authorities must clean up oil products and electromagnetic radiation from a total area of 300 000 hectares of military sites.

7. Treatment and storage of military radioactive waste

48. Many previous recommendations for treating these environmental threats have failed to consider the implications of storing large-scale waste. The storing process in itself may exacerbate many environmental problems and can be costly and ineffective.
49. It is not easy to gather information on military waste in general, and on radioactive military waste in particular.
50. For the United States, Russia and several other nations, the option of simply exporting hazardous waste has become appealing. In Russia’s case, the prospect of future revenues from importing waste have outweighed any health and safety considerations for the Russian people. The country plans to import 20 billion tonnes of radioactive waste, store it for a number of years, and then “reprocess it” – a practice as yet only vaguely defined. Russia has propagated this plan by referring to waste as a valuable raw material because it is possible to use extracted plutonium to power a special kind of nuclear reactor. Already, there is a growing problem of extensive dumping in the Russian Arctic of military waste from reactors, which has yet to be properly addressed. Many Third World countries are considering importing waste as a source of revenue; yet simply displacing waste fails to address the problem at a global level. When determining a storage method, one must consider the technical implications of finding safe storage and disposal sites, as well as the financial issues of covering the cost of security, decommissioning, decontamination and cleaning up.

8. Military waste storage

51. Military waste materials that are not destroyed or recycled are stored in ground or underground depositories or on the bed of seas or oceans.
52. In a special category of hazardous military waste are weapons dumped on the seabed or the ocean floor. Most of this waste is still chemically active and could cause not only serious environmental problems, but also economic problems. This particular issue has already been dealt with by the Assembly in its report on chemical munitions dumped in the Baltic Sea (Doc. 11601 and Resolution 1612 (2008)).

9. Lifting confidentiality

53. Member states should provide accurate information about the actual quantities and types of military waste in order to have a real assessment of the problem. This information cannot be treated as confidential. It is obvious that these materials are no longer needed by states. Freedom of access to any information concerning the environment should also be guaranteed.

10. Monitoring

54. Measures for environmental monitoring of the depositories of military waste should be introduced immediately, where it is not already done by the respective state authorities.

11. Conclusions

55. The problem of military waste cannot be treated at national level only; it represents a common European problem. Therefore, a common policy and methodology to tackle this issue should be developed.
56. The opportunities for recycling a part of this military waste should also be considered (especially for metals), due to the shortage of resources and need for sustainable development.
57. There is a need for a new international or European body and financial instrument to deal with the issue, to co-ordinate the efforts of member states and to foster co-operation among neighbouring countries on the utilisation of military waste, and to establish an environmentally safe control mechanism. It would also be useful if this body could co-operate with the environmental branch of NATO and other military alliances in order to harmonise policies and methodologies on the management of military waste.

Resolution 1775 (2010) Final version

Military waste and the environment

Author(s): Parliamentary Assembly

Origin - Text adopted by the Standing Committee, acting on behalf of the Assembly, on 12 November 2010 (see Doc. 12354, report of the Committee on the Environment, Agriculture and Local and Regional Affairs, rapporteur: Mr Toshev). See also Recommendation 1946 (2010).

1. The production of weapons used in war, their detonation and the eventual storage of the hazardous material in military waste disposal sites could have serious consequences for the environment. The utilisation and management of military waste is an issue that needs to be addressed by the Council of Europe member states as a serious environmental threat.
2. Many substances present in military waste are still active and can endanger nature and human health. Furthermore, it has only recently been shown that the exposure to detonated material can have disastrous effects. Unfortunately, these problems cannot be solved by simply displacing stored waste, ignoring the dangers of abandoned arsenals or implementing standards on a country-by-country basis.
3. During the last two decades, 10 serious incidents involving military waste have been reported, all of which resulted in victims, environmental damage and expense for repairing the damage caused. Such incidents affect not only the states in question, but go beyond their frontiers and are in fact a pan-European problem.
4. Important quantities of weapons dating from the First and Second World Wars and the Cold War are still stored by the military. However, competition in weapons production and rapid technological developments have resulted in most of these weapons becoming obsolete.
5. In a special category of hazardous military waste are weapons that have been dumped into the sea, and in some cases into rivers, in vast quantities. Most of this waste is still chemically active and could be the source of serious environmental problems. The Parliamentary Assembly has already dealt with this particular issue in its Resolution 1612 (2008) on chemical munitions dumped in the Baltic Sea.
6. The Assembly consequently calls upon member states to de-classify information about military waste, where such classification still exists.
7. In the light of the above, and especially with regard to the negative effects on the environment, the Assembly believes that military waste has become a problem that is common to all European countries.
8. The Assembly therefore invites the Council of Europe member states to:
8.1. create and implement a common European policy and methodology for military waste management, which also addresses means of recycling a part of this military waste, with a view to preserving the planet’s resources and ensuring sustainable development;
8.2. adopt acceptable regulations on freedom of information concerning the disposal of military waste in Europe and guarantee the availability of information on the types of waste material and any de-classification of information in this respect;
8.3. consider creating a new international or European body to deal with the issue and to co-ordinate the efforts of member states. Such an institution could help member states that face serious difficulties in solving their military waste problems, co-operate with European neighbouring countries on the utilisation of their military waste and establish a joint control mechanism;
8.4. initiate co-operation in this respect with NATO member states, as well with those Council of Europe member states that are not members of NATO, with a view to harmonising policies and methodologies on utilisation of military waste.

Recommendation 1946 (2010) Final version

Military waste and the environment

Author(s): Parliamentary Assembly

Origin - Text adopted by the Standing Committee, acting on behalf of the Assembly, on 12 November 2010 (see Doc. 12354, report of the Committee on the Environment, Agriculture and Local and Regional Affairs, rapporteur: Mr Toshev).

1. The Parliamentary Assembly, referring to its Resolution 1775 (2010) on military waste and the environment, reiterates that military waste is a problem that is common to all European countries.
2. It consequently calls on member and observer states to take the necessary steps to set up interstate co-operation and to ensure greater transparency, particularly where the communication of information is concerned.
3. The Assembly also recommends that the Committee of Ministers draft a set of guidelines to encourage member and observer states to adopt and implement co-ordinated strategies on dealing with military waste, as called for in the aforementioned resolution.

Reply from the Committee of Ministers



Doc. 12611/10 May 2011
Military waste and the environment
Recommendation 1946 (2010)
Reply from the Committee of Ministers
adopted at the 1113th meeting of the Ministers’ Deputies (4-5 May 2011)


1.       The Committee of Ministers has examined Parliamentary Assembly Recommendation 1946 (2010) on “Military waste and the environment”. It has brought the recommendation to the attention of member states’ governments and has also communicated it to the Committee of Senior Officials of the Council of Europe Conference of Ministers responsible for Spatial/Regional Planning (CEMAT).
2.       The Committee of Ministers acknowledges that military waste management is an important issue and a major responsibility for governments, given that many substances present in military waste are still active and can cause problems for the environment and for human health. It also shares the view that adequate measures need to be implemented, at the national level and possibly at the European level, to deal with military waste, and encourages the relevant authorities of member states, where appropriate, to give due consideration to the recommendation and the related resolution to this end.
3.       The Assembly is aware that at present, the Council of Europe is focusing on further streamlining its activities, with a view to concentrating its limited resources on its core objectives. The Committee of Ministers has noted that the Committee of Senior Officials of the Council of Europe Conference of Ministers responsible for Spatial/Regional Planning (CEMAT) has proposed to give attention to this question in the framework of its future work programme. This proposal would need to be reviewed in the light of the decisions of the Committee of Ministers on the programme and budget for 2012-2013.











Rapport
Les déchets militaires et l'environnement
Rapport | Doc. 12354 | 06 août 2010

Les déchets militaires et l'environnement

(Ancienne) Commission de l'environnement, de l'agriculture et des questions territoriales
Rapporteur : M. Latchezar TOSHEV, Bulgarie, PPE/DC
Origine - Renvoi en commission: Doc. 11462, Renvoi 3404 du 21 janvier 2008. 2010 - Commission permanente de novembre

Résumé

La commission de l’environnement, de l’agriculture et des questions territoriales de l’Assemblée déplore que l’utilisation et la gestion des déchets militaires, qui représentent une menace importante pour l’environnement, fassent partie du secret militaire. La plupart de ces déchets, qui ont d’ailleurs causé des dégâts humains et environnementaux ces dernières années, sont encore chimiquement actifs et peuvent entraîner des catastrophes à l’échelle européenne.
L’Assemblée devrait encourager, par conséquent, les Etats membres du Conseil de l’Europe à lever la confidentialité des informations concernant les déchets militaires, là où une telle confidentialité existe encore. Elle devrait également inviter les Etats membres à élaborer et à mettre en œuvre une politique et une stratégie européennes communes de gestion des déchets militaires, et à envisager la création d’un organe visant notamment à coordonner et à contrôler les actions nationales.

A. Projet de résolution


1. La production d’armes de guerre, leur explosion et, à terme, le stockage des matériaux dangereux dans les décharges militaires risquent d’engendrer de graves problèmes environnementaux. L’utilisation et la gestion des déchets militaires doivent être prises en compte par les Etats membres du Conseil de l’Europe en tant que menaces écologiques sérieuses.
2. Un grand nombre de substances composant les déchets militaires restent actives et peuvent porter préjudice à l’environnement et à la santé de l’homme. En outre, ce n’est que récemment que l’on a constaté les effets désastreux causés par l’exposition à des matériels ayant explosé. Malheureusement, pour résoudre ces problèmes, il ne suffit pas de déplacer les déchets stockés, de passer sous silence le danger que représente un arsenal laissé à l’abandon ou de mettre en œuvre des normes au cas par cas dans chaque pays.
3. Au cours des deux dernières décennies, une dizaine d’incidents liés aux déchets militaires ont été signalés. Tous ont fait des victimes, engendré des dommages environnementaux et entraîné des dépenses pour réparer les préjudices causés. De telles catastrophes ne touchent pas seulement les Etats en question; elles dépassent leurs frontières et constituent en réalité un problème commun à l’échelle européenne.
4. D’importantes quantités d’armes datant des deux guerres mondiales et de la guerre froide sont toujours stockées par les forces militaires. Toutefois, compte tenu de la concurrence en matière de production d’armement et des progrès technologiques rapides, la plupart d’entre elles sont devenues obsolètes.
5. Les armes immergées au fond des mers en quantité considérable et, dans certains cas, au fond des rivières, constituent une catégorie spéciale de déchets militaires dangereux. En effet, la plupart de ces déchets restent chimiquement actifs et risquent d’engendrer de graves problèmes environnementaux. L’Assemblée parlementaire a déjà traité cette question dans sa Résolution 1612 (2008) sur les munitions chimiques ensevelies dans la mer Baltique.
6. L’Assemblée encourage, par conséquent, les Etats membres à lever la confidentialité des informations concernant les déchets militaires, là où une telle confidentialité existe encore.
7. Compte tenu de ce qui précède, notamment au regard de leurs effets négatifs sur l’environnement, l’Assemblée estime que les déchets militaires sont devenus un problème commun à tous les pays européens.
8. L’Assemblée invite, par conséquent, les Etats membres du Conseil de l’Europe:
8.1. à élaborer et à mettre en œuvre une politique et une stratégie européennes communes de gestion des déchets militaires, qui couvriraient aussi les moyens de recycler une partie de ces déchets militaires vu la pénurie de ressources et la nécessité d’assurer un développement durable;
8.2. à adopter une réglementation acceptable pour les parties concernées sur la liberté d’information relative à l’élimination des déchets militaires en Europe et à garantir la mise à disposition d’informations sur les types de déchets et la levée de toute confidentialité à cet égard;
8.3. à envisager la création d’un nouvel organe européen ou international et d’un instrument financier européen pour traiter cette question et coordonner les actions des Etats membres. Une telle institution pourrait aider les Etats membres, qui peinent à régler leurs problèmes, à coopérer avec les pays voisins de l’Europe sur l’utilisation de leurs déchets militaires et à établir un mécanisme de contrôle commun;
8.4. à instaurer une coopération à cet égard avec les Etats membres de l’OTAN, ainsi que ceux des Etats membres du Conseil de l’Europe non membres de l’OTAN, afin d’harmoniser les politiques et les stratégies sur l’utilisation des déchets militaires.

B. Projet de recommandation


1. L’Assemblée parlementaire, faisant référence à sa Résolution … (2010) sur les déchets militaires et l’environnement, rappelle que les déchets militaires représentent un problème commun à tous les pays européens.
2. Elle demande, par conséquent, aux Etats de prendre les mesures nécessaires pour mettre en place une coopération interétatique et d’assurer une meilleure transparence, notamment en ce qui concerne la communication des informations.
3. L’Assemblée recommande également au Comité des Ministres d’élaborer un ensemble de lignes directrices pour encourager les Etats membres et non membres à adopter et à mettre en œuvre des stratégies coordonnées sur le traitement des déchets militaires, tel que demandé dans la résolution précitée.

C. Exposé des motifs, par M. Toshev, rapporteur




1. Introduction

1. L’origine de ce rapport est la proposition de résolution (Doc. 11462) sur les déchets militaires et l’environnement, présentée par M. Ivan Ivanov et plusieurs de ses collègues.
2. Afin de rassembler les informations nécessaires à l’élaboration du rapport, la commission de l’environnement, de l’agriculture et des questions territoriales a organisé une audition le 23 novembre 2009, à Paris. Lors de cette audition, la commission a entendu un exposé du lieutenant-colonel Nikolay Nikolov, qui fait partie du ministère bulgare de la Défense et qui est un expert des problèmes liés aux déchets militaires.
3. En décembre 2009, un questionnaire a été distribué aux Etats membres avec les questions suivantes:
  • Quels types et quelle quantité de déchets militaires inutilisés sont stockés sur votre territoire national?
  • Existe-t-il des informations accessibles à tous sur les lieux de stockage des déchets militaires (y compris des déchets radioactifs, le cas échéant)?
  • Si tel est le cas, incluent-elles des renseignements sur les déchets installés dans le lit de bassins hydrauliques ou enfouis profondément dans le sol?
  • Coopérez-vous avec d’autres Etats ou avec des institutions internationales pour résoudre les problèmes posés par la gestion des déchets militaires?
  • Cette question fait-elle l’objet d’une législation spécifique?
4. Des réponses ont été reçues de 20 Etats (Andorre, Belgique, Bulgarie, Croatie, République tchèque, Estonie, Géorgie, Allemagne, Grèce, Pays-Bas, Hongrie, Italie, Lituanie, Pologne, Portugal, Serbie, République slovaque, Slovénie, «l’ex-République yougoslave de Macédoine» et Turquie).
5. La plupart des réponses sur le dépôt des déchets militaires n’ont pas apporté beaucoup d’informations, ce qui explique le manque de données disponibles sur cette question.
6. Neuf des Etats qui ont répondu ont indiqué avoir une législation sur cette question. Cinq Etats ont dit collaborer avec d’autres Etats ou institutions pour résoudre les problèmes liés aux déchets militaires. Il est regrettable que 27 Etats n’aient fourni aucune information.
7. Le manque d’information a rendu impossible une étude comparative sur la législation des Etats membres du Conseil de l’Europe à ce sujet, le but initial du rapporteur.
8. L’Allemagne a fourni une réponse extrêmement précise, ce qui a été très apprécié par le rapporteur.
9. La commission a autorisé une visite du rapporteur et du secrétaire de la commission au siège de l’OTAN à Bruxelles. En raison de problèmes de transport, la réunion à l’OTAN s’est tenue en l’absence du rapporteur. Le secrétaire de la commission a néanmoins rencontré les personnes suivantes:
  • M. Henrik Dam, chef de la section JAIS (Joint Armaments and Industry Section) – Section conjointe armements et industrie, Division investissement défense;
  • M. Osman Tasman, chef de l’unité Armements terre, JAIS;
  • Lieutenant-colonel Filip Martel, vice-président de la CDNA (Conférence des directeurs nationaux des armements), Groupe sécurité des munitions, sous-groupe 5 sur la logistique entreposage et destruction;
  • Mme Marie-Claire Mortier, secrétaire.
10. Les informations suivantes lui ont été communiquées:
11. La thématique des «déchets militaires» est un vaste sujet. Il serait approprié de se focaliser sur un seul aspect, à savoir les munitions conventionnelles. Ce choix écarterait, bien entendu, les munitions nucléaires et chimiques.
12. L’OTAN a préparé un document sur la destruction des munitions conventionnelles qui passe en revue les meilleures techniques de destruction, pour faire ressortir les «meilleures pratiques» de diffusion (les problèmes étant similaires partout, il conviendrait d’éviter de réinventer la roue).
13. La zone géographique couverte par le Conseil de l’Europe coïncide globalement avec celle couverte par le programme de l’OTAN «Partenariat pour la paix».
14. Ayant appris que le rapporteur entendait se rendre en visite d’étude en Ukraine, les interlocuteurs ont informé le secrétaire de la commission que l’Ukraine a un vrai problème de «munitions abandonnées». L’OTAN soutient l’Ukraine pour traiter ce problème en mettant à sa disposition l’expertise de la NAMSA (l’Agence de maintenance et d’approvisionnement de l’OTAN, qui a un bureau à Kiev). La NAMSA travaille actuellement sur des contrats de destruction, pour les munitions et pour les armes (seules des techniques respectueuses de l’environnement seront utilisées).

1.1. L’utilisation des munitions

15. Les balles au plomb devraient être interdites du fait de la pollution au plomb engendrée lors des tirs.
16. Les balles à l’uranium appauvri doivent être considérées comme des munitions «conventionnelles». Il y a des discussions sur le point de savoir si les balles à l’uranium appauvri ont été ou non la cause de maladies dans les forces armées durant la guerre du Golfe.
17. D’autres discussions portent sur le nettoyage des champs de bataille.
18. Les sous-munitions sont interdites par la Convention d’Oslo sur les armes à sous-munitions.

1.2. L’entreposage des munitions

19. Les munitions en entrepôt constituent une menace permanente et grave pour l’environnement, la question n’étant pas «si», mais «quand» l’entrepôt est susceptible de sauter. C’est pourquoi les munitions ne devraient pas être entreposées à proximité (ou dans) des zones résidentielles.

1.3. La destruction des munitions

20. La destruction de munitions coûte très cher, mais, si les munitions ne sont pas détruites convenablement, elles finiront par exploser.

1.4. Le transport des munitions

21. Pour le transport des munitions, des réglementations civiles continuent de s’appliquer (ce qui est regrettable).
22. Parmi les questions à se poser, on pourrait se demander si, pour détruire des munitions conventionnelles, il est encore acceptable de les faire brûler à l’air libre. Une analyse de risque devrait permettre d’y répondre.
23. Deux documents auraient pu être utiles pour les travaux sur ce rapport:
  • STANAG 2510: «Gestion des déchets pour les activités militaires de l’OTAN»
  • STANAG 2545: «Glossaire de l’OTAN sur la protection de l’environnement», (STANAG = STANdardisation AGreement)
Cependant, ces documents ne pouvaient être confiés à des civils; ils ne peuvent être obtenus que sur demande à une représentation nationale auprès de l’OTAN.
24. Dans ce contexte, il était difficile pour le rapporteur de préparer une analyse très approfondie de la situation. Malgré son désir que le rapport se fonde sur des informations fournies officiellement par les Etats membres, une part importante des sources d’information qui lui ont permis d’établir ce rapport provient des publications des organisations non gouvernementales (ONG) et des médias.



2. Effets de la production et de la fabrication




25. La guerre fait non seulement de nombreuses victimes et dévaste les paysages mais elle laisse aussi, dans son sillage, de sérieuses séquelles qui peuvent handicaper un pays durant de longues années, même une fois réglés les problèmes politiques. La production d’armes de guerre, leur explosion et finalement le stockage des matériaux dangereux utilisés ont des effets négatifs auxquels il faut faire face. Un grand nombre de substances composant les déchets militaires restent actives et peuvent porter préjudice à l’environnement et à la santé de l’homme.
26. En outre, la recherche n’a montré que tout récemment les incidences à long terme de l’exposition à des matériels ayant explosé et qui se sont révélés très dangereux. Il ne suffit pas de déplacer les déchets stockés, de passer sous silence le danger que représente un arsenal laissé à l’abandon ou de mettre en œuvre des normes au cas par cas dans chaque pays pour résoudre la question comme il convient. Au cours de ces deux dernières décennies, une dizaine d’incidents liés aux déchets militaires ont été signalés en Ouzbékistan, en Albanie, en Bulgarie, en Russie, en France, en Ukraine, etc. Ils ont fait des victimes, causé des dommages environnementaux et entraîné des dépenses pour les réparer.
27. D’importantes quantités d’armes datant de la première guerre mondiale, de la seconde guerre mondiale et de la guerre froide sont toujours stockées par les forces militaires. Toutefois, la concurrence qui a fait rage pendant la guerre froide en matière de production d’armements et les progrès technologiques rapides font que la plupart de ces armes sont devenues obsolètes.

3. Exemples de données recueillies pendant l’élaboration du rapport




28. D’après les données collectées, environ 2,5 millions de tonnes de déchets militaires sont stockés en Ukraine depuis l’époque soviétique dans quelque 6 000 sites de stockage. Une partie de ces déchets est entreposée sans mesure de précaution particulière.
29. Il importe d’accorder une attention spéciale au problème de l’enfouissement des déchets radioactifs.
30. Il existe un programme national sur l’utilisation des armes non nécessaires en Ukraine, qui couvre la période 2006-2017, ainsi que plusieurs réglementations sur les procédures à suivre pour utiliser et manipuler les armes. L’Ukraine a besoin d’aide pour résoudre les problèmes liés aux déchets militaires.
31. Malheureusement, le rapporteur n’a pas été en mesure de se rendre en Ukraine pour se faire une idée plus précise de la situation. Nos données fournissent des renseignements sur une série d’explosions et d’incidents survenus entre 2004 et 2006 dans l’arsenal de Novobohdanivka. Certains éléments permettent de croire que la situation reste préoccupante en Ukraine eu égard à la gestion et à l’utilisation des déchets militaires, et qu’elle n’a pas vraiment évolué depuis. Cette situation complexe s’explique en partie par l’insuffisance des ressources financières pour apporter une réponse appropriée à ce problème.
32. En Moldova, environ 20 000 tonnes d’armes et de munitions sont stockées au poste de Cobasna sur le territoire de la Transnistrie. Aucune donnée supplémentaire n’est disponible sur cette question    (3)    . Voir également lesrapports de l’Assemblée sur le fonctionnement des institutions démocratiquesen Moldova (Doc. 9418) de 2002, paragraphes 107 à 111 de l’exposédes motifs, et celui de 2007 sur le respect des obligations et des engagementsde la Moldova (Doc. 11374), paragraphes 223 et 224 de l’exposé desmotifs..
33. D’après un rapport de l’OSCE de 2007, l’utilisation de déchets militaires a eu au Bélarus de graves conséquences pour l’environnement, et a notamment obligé les autorités locales à nettoyer un territoire d’environ 300 000 hectares, correspondant à l’emplacement d’anciennes bases militaires.
34. D’après un article de Peter Szyszlo    (4)    . Central Europe Review,vol. 1, no 21, 15 novembre 1999., la commission russe présidée par Yablokov a estimé que l’URSS a déversé depuis 1965 dans l’océan un total de 2,5 millions de curie de déchets radioactifs enfermés ou non – parmi lesquels 16 réacteurs de sous-marins et de brise-glace nucléaires – dans les golfes situés près de Novaja Zemlja. Il est établi dans le même document que, entre 1964 et 1991, entre 11 000 et 17 000 conteneurs de déchets radioactifs liquides et solides ont été déversés dans la même région. Certains des conteneurs ont été percés pour faciliter leur immersion. Les zones dans lesquelles cette méthode d’élimination très dangereuse a été employée à l’époque soviétique, entraînant un risque de pollution radioactive, sont, d’après le même article, les mers de Barents et de Kara et les environs de Novaja Zemlja. Ce «cimetière nucléaire», selon Peter Szyszlo, ne servait «pas uniquement pour les déchets radioactifs mais aussi pour les réacteurs, les navires à propulsion nucléaire déclassés et, plus récemment, pour les armes nucléaires démantelées».
35. Le rapporteur souhaiterait mettre en relation ces informations avec celles sur la situation dans la région arctique, qui ont été communiquées par les autorités norvégiennes lors de l’audition organisée à Tromso en 1999 par la commission de l’environnement, de l’aménagement du territoire et des pouvoirs locaux.
36. Pour le rapporteur, il serait très important et opportun que la Fédération de Russie accepte de coopérer avec le Conseil de l’Europe, l’Union européenne et les Nations Unies en vue de résoudre ce problème qui n’est manifestement pas uniquement un problème national.
37. On dénombre actuellement dans la Fédération de Russie 27 textes juridiques qui réglementent l’utilisation des déchets militaires, mais aucune législation n’a été adoptée en la matière. Un programme fédéral sur l’utilisation des armes et des techniques militaires a été adopté en 2005 et sera en vigueur jusqu’à la fin de 2010. Il vise à réduire de 70 % les dépenses consacrées au stockage des armes non nécessaires. La Fédération de Russie possède également une loi fédérale sur la coopération technique militaire avec d’autres pays, qui porte notamment sur la question de l’utilisation des armes et des techniques militaires.
38. Le rapporteur n’a pas eu à sa disposition d’autres renseignements sur les engagements pris par la Fédération de Russie pour résoudre les problèmes posés par les anciens sites d’élimination des déchets militaires, et en particulier par les déchets déposés dans des bassins hydrauliques.
39. Un article de Jonathan Owen paru dans l’hebdomadaire britannique The Independent on Sunday du 22 juin 2008, sous le titre «Soldiers dumped munitions with household waste» (Des soldats jettent des munitions avec les ordures ménagères), rend compte d’environ 20 incidents de ce genre qui se sont produits en Grande-Bretagne, les qualifiant d’«habitude militaire dangereuse manquant cruellement de professionnalisme», passible de sanctions par le Bureau de la santé et de la sécurité (Health and Safety Executive) et l’Agence pour l’environnement (Environmental Agency). La Chambre des communes a tenu le 20 mai 2008 une discussion sur les déchets radioactifs militaires, au cours de laquelle cette question a été examinée.
40. La Bulgarie possède son programme national, adopté en 2004, pour l’utilisation et la destruction des munitions excédentaires sur son territoire. Quatre grandes sections de la législation portent également sur la question de leur utilisation.
41. Il y avait, en 2003, en Bulgarie 59 000 tonnes de munitions excédentaires. Après la réforme qui a débuté en 2005 et qui visait à transformer l’armée en une armée professionnelle, ce chiffre est passé à 67 000 tonnes. Il existe actuellement en Bulgarie un plan de gestion des déchets militaires, qui devrait être pleinement mis en œuvre d’ici à 2015.
42. Une grosse explosion de munitions excédentaires s’est produite près de Sofia le 3 juillet 2008, causant des dommages matériels mais heureusement pas de victimes.
43. Des explosions similaires de munitions excédentaires ont eu lieu le 15 mars 2008 dans le village de Gerdech près de Tirana en Albanie, le 17 juillet 2008 dans les entrepôts de missiles et d’artillerie près de la ville de Kagan en Ouzbékistan, le 4 septembre 2009 dans l’usine «Parvi Partizan» près de la ville d’Uzjice en Serbie, le 13 novembre 2009 dans les entrepôts Arsenal-31 près de la ville d’Ulianovsk en Fédération de Russie, etc.

4. Effets de la production d’armes sur la santé et l’environnement

44. La pollution de l’environnement qui résulte de la fabrication d’armes et de matériels militaires est sans conteste un problème mondial auquel de nombreux pays doivent faire face. Qu’il s’agisse de la contamination de l’air, de l’eau ou du sol, les problèmes environnementaux engendrés par la fabrication d’armes devraient faire l’objet d’un examen sérieux même s’ils ne sont pas immédiatement perçus comme les conséquences proprement dites de conflits. C’est pourquoi ces problèmes sont souvent laissés de côté au profit d’autres questions qui, apparaissant plus urgentes, sont placées au cœur du débat écologique.
45. La production d’armes nucléaires entraîne le rejet de matériels cancérigènes et mutagènes, comme le plutonium, l’uranium, le strontium, le césium, le benzène, les polychlorobiphényles (PCB), le mercure et le cyanure. Ces produits chimiques restent nocifs pendant des milliers, voire des dizaines de milliers d’années. Etant donné les méthodes d’élimination actuellement employées, ces matériels se diffusent dans l’eau potable, les eaux souterraines et les sols. A l’heure actuelle, le contaminant spécifique qui retient l’attention est le perchlorate. Ce produit chimique dont la production est de plusieurs milliers de tonnes par an est le composant primaire des agents propulseurs. Il est employé depuis des dizaines d’années pour les propergols solides et la fabrication de roquettes et de missiles; le perchlorate, qui se dissout et se diffuse facilement dans l’eau, a ainsi été retrouvé dans l’eau potable et dans des produits alimentaires. Des recherches ont montré qu’il était nocif pour la thyroïde et provoquait des retards de croissance.

5. Emissions dues aux explosions

46. Un point peut-être encore plus important oublié dans le débat environnemental concerne les effets à long terme des matériels dangereux qui subsistent longtemps après le départ des forces armées dans les pays qui ont été ravagés par la guerre. Ces incidences sur l’environnement sont souvent les plus difficiles à détecter si aucune attention particulière ne leur est accordée. Etant donné que c’est à la guerre moderne que l’on doit l’utilisation des produits chimiques les plus manifestement nocifs, il existe peu d’études de cas donnant des résultats fiables sur la question.

6. Déchets militaires dangereux

47. Pour certaines régions d’Europe orientale, les conséquences environnementales de l’après-guerre portent sur plusieurs secteurs écologiques et constituent toujours une grave menace pour l’approvisionnement en eau, la qualité de l’air et la sécurité des populations qui y vivent. Etant donné l’occupation soviétique qui a précédé, les pays concernés se retrouvent avec des bases militaires abandonnées, des armes non détectées et des déchets nocifs et radioactifs. En outre, ces problèmes sont aggravés par une réglementation laxiste. A elle seule, la Moldova se heurte aujourd’hui à la difficulté de gérer 8 000 tonnes de déchets toxiques qui sont stockées en toute illégalité et de façon anarchique, entraînant une contamination de l’eau. Selon les chiffres à notre disposition, il y a aussi 20 000 tonnes d’armes et de munitions intransportables qui se trouvent en totalité sur le territoire de la Transnistrie. L’explosion de ces munitions provoquerait sans aucun doute une catastrophe humanitaire. En Ukraine, 2,5 millions de tonnes d’armes, de munitions et de déchets militaires sont abandonnées. Des déchets radioactifs gisent enfouis dans le sol de quatre des sites concernés. De plus, 39 % des eaux usées sont contaminées et 25 % retournent dans la nature. Le Bélarus, quant à lui, est confronté à l’élimination des armements laissés par l’Union soviétique qui sont à la fois radioactifs et toxiques. Les pouvoirs locaux doivent maintenant nettoyer les hydrocarbures et les produits radioactifs abandonnés sur 300 000 hectares de sites militaires.

7. Méthodes de traitement et de stockage des déchets militaires radioactifs

48. Nombre de recommandations antérieures relatives au traitement de ces menaces environnementales ont négligé d’aborder les problèmes posés par le stockage de déchets à grande échelle. Ce processus de stockage lui-même peut aggraver les problèmes écologiques, être coûteux et inefficace.
49. Il n’est pas facile de recueillir des informations sur les déchets militaires en général, et sur les déchets militaires radioactifs en particulier.
50. Pour les Etats-Unis, la Russie et plusieurs autres pays, il est devenu tentant d’envisager d’exporter tout simplement les déchets dangereux. Dans le cas de la Russie, la perspective de recettes futures tirées de l’importation de déchets a relégué au second plan les considérations de santé et de sécurité publiques. Moscou projette d’importer 20 milliards de tonnes de déchets radioactifs, de les stocker pendant plusieurs années, puis de les «retraiter», pratique qui n’est encore que vaguement définie. La Russie a défendu ce plan en qualifiant les déchets de matière première précieuse dont il serait possible d’extraire du plutonium pour faire fonctionner un type spécial de réacteur nucléaire. Se pose déjà un problème de plus en plus grave, à savoir le rejet à grande échelle de déchets militaires provenant de réacteurs dont le stockage dans la zone arctique de la Russie n’est toujours pas traité comme il convient. De nombreux pays du tiers-monde envisagent d’importer des déchets comme source de revenus; cependant, le déplacement des déchets ne permet pas de traiter le problème à l’échelon mondial. Pour choisir une méthode de stockage, il faut prendre en compte les incidences techniques de l’exploitation de sites de stockage et d’élimination sûrs, ainsi que les questions financières liées au coût de leur sécurité, de leur déclassement, de leur décontamination et de leur dépollution.

8. Stockage des déchets militaires

51. Les déchets militaires qui ne sont pas détruits ou recyclés sont enfouis dans le sol, stockés dans des dépôts souterrains ou bien déversés au fond des mers ou des océans.
52. Les armes immergées dans le fond des mers ou des océans constituent une catégorie spéciale de déchets militaires dangereux. Or, la plupart de ces déchets restent chimiquement actifs et risquent d’engendrer non seulement de graves problèmes environnementaux, mais également des problèmes économiques. Cette question a déjà été examinée par l’Assemblée dans son rapport sur les munitions chimiques déversées dans la mer Baltique (Doc. 11601 et Résolution 1612 (2008)).

9. Levée de la confidentialité

53. Les Etats membres devraient fournir des informations précises sur les types et quantités réelles de déchets militaires afin de permettre une évaluation exacte du problème. Ces informations ne peuvent pas être classées sous la rubrique «confidentiel». Il est manifeste que les Etats n’ont plus besoin de ces matériels. Il est indispensable de garantir la liberté d’accès aux informations concernant l’environnement.

10. Suivi

54. Les pouvoirs publics nationaux devraient prendre immédiatement des mesures de suivi environnemental concernant les dépôts de déchets militaires.

11. Conclusions

55. Le problème des déchets militaires ne peut pas être traité uniquement au niveau national. C’est un problème commun à tous les pays européens. Il faut, par conséquent, mettre en place une politique et une méthodologie communes pour traiter cette question.
56. Il faudrait aussi étudier les possibilités de recyclage d’une partie de ces déchets militaires (notamment les métaux), vu la pénurie de ressources et la nécessité d’assurer un développement durable.
57. Il serait bon de mettre en place un nouvel organe européen ou international pour traiter cette question, coordonner les actions des Etats membres, coopérer avec les pays voisins de l’Europe pour garantir une utilisation des déchets militaires qui soit sans risque pour l’environnement et mettre en œuvre un mécanisme de contrôle. Il serait, en outre, utile que cet organe collabore avec la branche environnementale de l’OTAN et d’autres alliances militaires afin d’harmoniser les politiques et les méthodes concernant l’utilisation des déchets militaires.


Résolution 1775 (2010) Version finale

Les déchets militaires et l'environnement

Auteur(s) : Assemblée parlementaire
Origine - Texte adopté par la Commission permanente, agissant au nom de l’Assemblée, le 12 novembre 2010 (voir Doc. 12354, rapport de la commission de l’environnement, de l’agriculture et des questions territoriales, rapporteur: M. Toshev). Voir également la Recommandation 1946 (2010).
1. La production d’armes de guerre, leur explosion et, à terme, le stockage des matériaux dangereux dans les décharges militaires risquent d’avoir de graves conséquences sur l’environnement. L’utilisation et la gestion des déchets militaires doivent être prises en compte par les Etats membres du Conseil de l’Europe en tant que menaces écologiques sérieuses.
2. Un grand nombre de substances composant les déchets militaires restent actives et peuvent porter préjudice à l’environnement et à la santé de l’homme. En outre, récemment seulement, on a constaté les effets désastreux causés par l’exposition à des matériels ayant explosé. Malheureusement, pour résoudre ces problèmes, il ne suffit pas de déplacer les déchets stockés, de passer sous silence le danger que représente un arsenal laissé à l’abandon ou de mettre en œuvre des normes au cas par cas dans chaque pays.
3. Au cours des deux dernières décennies, une dizaine d’accidents sérieux liés aux déchets militaires ont été signalés. Tous ont fait des victimes, engendré des dommages environnementaux et entraîné des dépenses pour réparer les préjudices causés. De tels accidents ne touchent pas seulement les Etats en question, ils dépassent leurs frontières et constituent en réalité un problème commun à l’échelle européenne.
4. D’importantes quantités d’armes datant des deux guerres mondiales et de la guerre froide sont toujours stockées par les forces militaires. Toutefois, du fait de la concurrence en matière de production d’armement et des progrès technologiques rapides, la plupart d’entre elles sont devenues obsolètes.
5. Les armes immergées en quantité considérable au fond des mers, et dans certains cas au fond des rivières, constituent une catégorie spéciale de déchets militaires dangereux. En effet, la plupart de ces déchets restent chimiquement actifs et risquent d’engendrer de graves problèmes environnementaux. L’Assemblée parlementaire a déjà traité cette question dans sa Résolution 1612 (2008) sur les munitions chimiques déversées dans la mer Baltique.
6. L’Assemblée encourage, par conséquent, les Etats membres à lever la confidentialité des informations concernant les déchets militaires, là où une telle confidentialité existe encore.
7. Compte tenu de ce qui précède, notamment au regard de leurs effets négatifs sur l’environnement, l’Assemblée estime que les déchets militaires sont devenus un problème commun à tous les pays européens.
8. L’Assemblée invite, par conséquent, les Etats membres du Conseil de l’Europe:
8.1. à élaborer et à mettre en œuvre une politique et une stratégie européennes communes de gestion des déchets militaires, qui couvrent aussi les moyens de recycler une partie de ces déchets, en vue de préserver les ressources de la planète et d’assurer un développement durable;
8.2. à adopter une réglementation acceptable sur la liberté d’information relative à l’élimination des déchets militaires en Europe, et à garantir la mise à disposition d’informations sur les types de déchets ainsi que la levée de toute confidentialité à cet égard;
8.3. à envisager la création d’un nouvel organe européen ou international pour traiter cette question et coordonner les actions des Etats membres. Une telle institution pourrait aider les Etats membres, qui peinent à régler leurs problèmes, à coopérer avec les pays voisins de l’Europe sur l’utilisation de leurs déchets militaires et à établir un mécanisme de contrôle commun;
8.4. à instaurer une coopération à cet égard avec les Etats membres de l’OTAN, ainsi qu’avec ceux des Etats membres du Conseil de l’Europe non membres de l’OTAN, afin d’harmoniser les politiques et les stratégies sur l’utilisation des déchets militaires.



Recommandation 1946 (2010) Version finale

Les déchets militaires et l'environnement

Auteur(s) : Assemblée parlementaire
Origine - Texte adopté par la Commission permanente, agissant au nom de l’Assemblée, le 12 novembre 2010 (voir Doc. 12354, rapport de la commission de l’environnement, de l’agriculture et des questions territoriales, rapporteur: M. Toshev).
1. L’Assemblée parlementaire, faisant référence à sa Résolution 1775 (2010) sur les déchets militaires et l’environnement, rappelle que les déchets militaires représentent un problème commun à tous les pays européens.
2. Elle demande, par conséquent, aux Etats membres et observateurs de prendre les mesures nécessaires pour mettre en place une coopération interétatique et d’assurer une meilleure transparence, notamment en ce qui concerne la communication des informations.
3. L’Assemblée recommande également au Comité des Ministres d’élaborer un ensemble de lignes directrices pour encourager les Etats membres et observateurs à adopter et à mettre en œuvre des stratégies coordonnées sur le traitement des déchets militaires, tel que demandé dans la résolution précitée.







Déchets militaires

http://www.diplomatie-presse.com/?page_id=4154
http://www.diplomatie-presse.com/?p=3278













La Commission de l’environnement, de l’agriculture et des questions territoriales de l’Assemblée déplore que l’utilisation et la gestion des déchets militaires, qui représentent une menace importante pour l’environnement, fassent partie du secret militaire. La plupart de ces déchets, qui ont d’ailleurs causé des dégâts humains et environnementaux ces dernières années, sont encore chimiquement actifs et peuvent entraîner des catastrophes à l’échelle européenne. (…)
La production d’armes de guerre, leur explosion et, à terme, le stockage des matériaux dangereux dans les décharges militaires risquent d’engendrer de graves problèmes environnementaux. L’utilisation et la gestion des déchets militaires doivent être prises en compte par les États membres du Conseil de l’Europe en tant que menaces écologiques sérieuses.
Un grand nombre de substances composant les déchets militaires restent actives et peuvent porter préjudice à l’environnement et à la santé de l’Homme. En outre, ce n’est que récemment que l’on a constaté les effets désastreux causés par l’exposition à des matériels ayant explosé. Malheureusement, pour résoudre ces problèmes, il ne suffit pas de déplacer les déchets stockés, de passer sous silence le danger que représente un arsenal laissé à l’abandon ou de mettre en œuvre des normes au cas par cas dans chaque pays.
Au cours des deux dernières décennies, une dizaine d’incidents liés aux déchets militaires ont été signalés. Tous ont fait des victimes, engendré des dommages environnementaux et entraîné des dépenses pour réparer les préjudices causés. De telles catastrophes ne touchent pas seulement les États en question ; elles dépassent leurs frontières et constituent en réalité un problème commun à l’échelle européenne.
D’importantes quantités d’armes datant des deux guerres mondiales et de la guerre froide sont toujours stockées par les forces militaires. Toutefois, compte tenu de la concurrence en matière de production d’armement et des progrès technologiques rapides, la plupart d’entre elles sont devenues obsolètes.
Les armes immergées au fond des mers en quantité considérable, et dans certains cas au fond des rivières, constituent une catégorie spéciale de déchets militaires dangereux. En effet, la plupart de ces déchets restent chimiquement actifs et risquent d’engendrer de graves problèmes environnementaux (2). (…)
Un rapport qui se heurte au secret défenseL’origine de ce rapport est la proposition de résolution sur les déchets militaires et l’environnement, présentée par M. Ivan Ivanov et plusieurs de ses collègues. Afin de rassembler les informations nécessaires à l’élaboration du rapport, la Commission de l’environnement, de l’agriculture et des questions territoriales a organisé une audition le 23 novembre 2009 à Paris. Lors de cette audition, la Commission a entendu un exposé du lieutenant-colonel Nikolay Nikolov, du ministère bulgare de la Défense, qui est un expert des problèmes liés aux déchets militaires. En décembre 2009, un questionnaire a été distribué aux État membres avec les questions suivantes :
– « Quels types et quelle quantité de déchets militaires inutilisés sont stockés sur votre territoire national ? »
– « Existe-t-il des informations accessibles à tous sur les lieux de stockage des déchets militaires (y compris des déchets radioactifs, le cas échéant) ? »
– « Si tel est le cas, incluent-elles des renseignements sur les déchets installés dans le lit de bassins hydrauliques ou enfouis profondément dans le sol ? »
– « Coopérez-vous avec d’autres États ou avec des institutions internationales pour résoudre les problèmes posés par la gestion des déchets militaires ? »
– « Cette question fait-elle l’objet d’une législation spécifique ? »
Des réponses ont été reçues de 20 États (Andorre, Belgique, Bulgarie, Croatie, République tchèque, Estonie, Géorgie, Allemagne, Grèce, Hollande, Hongrie, Italie, Lituanie, Pologne, Portugal, Serbie, République slovaque, Slovénie, « Ancienne République yougoslave de Macédoine » et Turquie). La plupart des réponses sur le dépôt des déchets militaires n’ont pas apporté beaucoup d’informations, ce qui explique le manque de données disponibles sur cette question.
Neuf des États qui ont répondu ont indiqué avoir une législation sur cette question. Cinq États ont dit collaborer avec d’autres États ou institutions pour résoudre les problèmes liés aux déchets militaires. Il est regrettable que 27 États n’aient fourni aucune information.
Le manque d’information a rendu impossible une étude comparative sur la législation des États membres du Conseil de l’Europe à ce sujet, le but initial du rapporteur.L’Allemagne a fourni une réponse extrêmement précise, ce qui a été très apprécié par le rapporteur. La Commission a autorisé une visite du rapporteur et du secrétaire de la Commission au siège de l’OTAN à Bruxelles. En raison de problèmes de transport, la réunion à l’OTAN s’est tenue en l’absence du rapporteur. Le secrétaire de la Commission a néanmoins rencontré les personnes suivantes :
– M. Henrik Dam, chef de la Section JAIS (Section conjointe Armements, Industrie et Défense, Division Investissement Défense) ;
– M. Osman Tasman, chef de l’Unité Armement Terre, JAIS ;
– Lt. Col. Filip Martel, vice-président de la CNAD (Conférence des Directeurs nationaux de l’Armement), Groupe Sécurité des Munitions, Sous-groupe 5 sur la Logistique Entreposage et Destruction ;
– Mme Marie-Claire Mortier, Secrétaire.
Les informations suivantes lui ont été communiquées :
La thématique des « déchets militaires » est un vaste sujet. Il serait approprié de se focaliser sur un seul aspect, à savoir les munitions conventionnelles. Ce choix écarterait, bien entendu, les munitions nucléaires et chimiques.
L’OTAN a préparé un document sur la destruction des munitions conventionnelles qui passe en revue les meilleures techniques de destruction, pour faire ressortir les « meilleures pratiques » de diffusion (les problèmes étant similaires partout ailleurs, il conviendrait d’éviter de réinventer la roue).
La zone géographique couverte par le Conseil de l’Europe coïncide globalement avec celle couverte par le programme de l’OTAN « Partenariat pour la Paix ».
Ayant appris que le rapporteur entendait se rendre en visite d’étude en Ukraine, les interlocuteurs ont informé le secrétaire de la Commission que l’Ukraine a un vrai problème de « munitions abandonnées ». L’OTAN soutient l’Ukraine pour traiter ce problème en mettant à sa disposition l’expertise de la NAMSA (agence de maintenance et d’approvisionnement de l’OTAN, qui a un bureau à Kiev). La NAMSA travaille actuellement sur des contrats de destruction, pour les munitions et pour les armes (seules des techniques respectueuses de l’environnement seront utilisées).


Manipulation des munitions

 
Les balles au plomb devraient être interdites du fait de la pollution au plomb engendrée lors des tirs. Les balles à l’uranium appauvri doivent être considérées comme des munitions « conventionnelles ». Il y a des discussions sur le point de savoir si les balles à l’uranium appauvri ont été ou non la cause de maladies dans les forces armées durant la guerre du Golfe. D’autres discussions portent sur le nettoyage des champs de bataille. Les sous-munitions sont interdites par la Convention d’Oslo sur les armes à sous-munitions.
Les munitions en entrepôt constituent une menace permanente et grave pour l’environnement, la question n’étant pas « si », mais « quand » l’entrepôt est susceptible de sauter. C’est pourquoi les munitions ne devraient pas être entreposées à proximité (ou dans) des zones résidentielles.
La destruction de munitions coûte très cher, mais, si les munitions ne sont pas détruites convenablement, elles finiront par exploser.
Pour le transport des munitions, des réglementations civiles continuent de s’appliquer (ce qui est regrettable).
Parmi les questions à se poser, on pourrait se demander si, pour détruire des munitions conventionnelles, il est encore acceptable de les faire brûler à l’air libre. Une analyse de risque devrait permettre d’y répondre.
Deux documents auraient pu être utiles pour les travaux sur ce rapport :
- STANAG 2510 (3), « Gestion des déchets pour les activités militaires de l’OTAN » ;
- STANAG 2545, « Glossaire de l’OTAN sur la protection de l’environnement ».
Cependant, ces documents ne pouvaient être confiés à des civils ; ils ne peuvent être obtenus que sur demande à une représentation nationale auprès de l’OTAN.
Dans ce contexte, il était difficile pour le rapporteur de préparer une analyse très approfondie de la situation. Malgré son désir que le rapport se base sur des informations fournies officiellement par les États membres, une part importante des sources d’information qui lui ont permis d’établir ce rapport provient des publications des ONG et des médias.


Effets de la production et de la fabrication

 
La guerre fait non seulement de nombreuses victimes et dévaste les paysages mais elle laisse aussi, dans son sillage, de sérieuses séquelles qui peuvent handicaper un pays de longues années même une fois réglés les problèmes politiques. La production d’armes de guerre, leur explosion et finalement le stockage des matériaux dangereux utilisés ont des effets négatifs auxquels il faut faire face. Un grand nombre de substances composant les déchets militaires restent actives et peuvent porter préjudice à l’environnement et à la santé de l’Homme.
En outre, la recherche n’a montré que tout récemment les incidences à long terme de l’exposition à des matériels ayant explosé et qui se sont révélés très dangereux. Il ne suffit pas de déplacer les déchets stockés, de passer sous silence le danger que représente un arsenal laissé à l’abandon ou de mettre en œuvre des normes au cas par cas dans chaque pays pour résoudre la question comme il convient. Au cours de ces deux dernières décennies, une dizaine d’incidents liés aux déchets militaires ont été signalés en Ouzbékistan, en Albanie, en Bulgarie, en Russie, en France, en Ukraine, etc. Ils ont fait des victimes, causé des dommages environnementaux et entraîné des dépenses pour les réparer.
D’importantes quantités d’armes datant de la Première Guerre mondiale, de la Seconde Guerre mondiale et de la guerre froide sont toujours stockées par les forces militaires. Toutefois, la concurrence qui a fait rage pendant la guerre froide en matière de production d’armement et les progrès technologiques rapides font que la plupart de ces armes sont devenues obsolètes.


Exemples de données recueillies pendant l’élaboration du rapport

Ukraine

 
D’après les données collectées, environ 2,5 millions de tonnes de déchets militaires sont stockés en Ukraine depuis l’époque soviétique dans quelque 6 000 sites de stockage. Une partie de ces déchets est entreposée sans mesure de précaution particulière.
Il importe d’accorder une attention spéciale au problème de l’enfouissement des déchets radioactifs.
Il existe un programme national sur l’utilisation des armes non nécessaires en Ukraine, qui couvre la période 2006-2017, ainsi que plusieurs réglementations sur les procédures à suivre pour utiliser et manipuler les armes. L’Ukraine a besoin d’aide pour résoudre les problèmes liés aux déchets militaires.
Malheureusement, le rapporteur n’a pas été en mesure de se rendre en Ukraine pour se faire une idée plus précise de la situation. Nos données fournissent des renseignements sur une série d’explosions et d’incidents survenus entre 2004 et 2006 dans l’arsenal de Novobohdanivka. Certains éléments permettent de croire que la situation reste préoccupante en Ukraine eu égard à la gestion et à l’utilisation des déchets militaires, et qu’elle n’a pas vraiment évolué depuis. Cette situation complexe s’explique en partie par l’insuffisance des ressources financières pour apporter une réponse appropriée à ce problème.


Moldavie

 
En Moldavie, environ 20 000 tonnes d’armes et de munitions sont stockées au poste de Cobasna sur le territoire de la Transnistrie. Aucune donnée supplémentaire n’est disponible sur cette question.


Biélorussie

 
D’après un rapport de l’OSCE de 2007, l’utilisation de déchets militaires a eu en Biélorussie de graves conséquences pour l’environnement, et a notamment obligé les autorités locales à nettoyer un territoire d’environ 300 000 hectares, correspondant à l’emplacement d’anciennes bases militaires.


URSS et Russie

 
D’après un article de Peter Szyszlo (Central European Review), la Commission russe présidée par Yablokov a estimé que l’URSS a déversé depuis 1965 dans l’océan un total de 2,5 millions de curies de déchets radioactifs contenus ou non – parmi lesquels 16 réacteurs de sous-marins et de brise-glace nucléaires – dans les golfes situés près de la Nouvelle-Zemble. Il est établi dans le même document que de 1964 à 1991, entre 11 000 et 17 000 conteneurs de déchets radioactifs liquides et solides ont été déversés dans la même région. Certains des conteneurs ont été percés pour faciliter leur immersion. Les zones dans lesquelles cette méthode d’élimination très dangereuse a été employée à l’époque soviétique, entraînant un risque de pollution radioactive, sont, d’après le même article, les mers de Barents et de Kara et les environs de la Nouvelle-Zemble. Ce « cimetière nucléaire », selon Peter Szyszlo, ne servait « pas uniquement pour les déchets radioactifs mais aussi pour les réacteurs, les navires à propulsion nucléaire déclassés et plus récemment pour les armes nucléaires démantelées ».
Le rapporteur souhaiterait mettre en relation ces informations avec celles sur la situation dans la région arctique, qui ont été communiquées par les autorités norvégiennes lors de l’audition organisée à Tromsö en 1999 par la Commission de l’environnement, de l’aménagement du territoire et des pouvoirs locaux.
Pour le rapporteur, il serait très important et opportun que la Fédération de Russie accepte de coopérer avec le Conseil de l’Europe, l’Union européenne et les Nations Unies en vue de résoudre ce problème qui n’est manifestement pas uniquement un problème national.
On dénombre actuellement dans la Fédération de Russie 27 textes juridiques qui réglementent l’utilisation des déchets militaires, mais aucune législation n’a été adoptée en la matière. Un programme fédéral sur l’utilisation des armes et des techniques militaires a été adopté en 2005 et sera en vigueur jusqu’à la fin de 2010. Il vise à réduire de 70 % les dépenses consacrées au stockage des armes non nécessaires. La Fédération de Russie possède également une loi fédérale sur la coopération technique militaire avec d’autres pays, qui porte notamment sur la question de l’utilisation des armes et des techniques militaires.
Le rapporteur n’a pas eu à sa disposition d’autres renseignements sur les engagements pris par la Fédération de Russie pour résoudre les problèmes posés par les anciens sites d’élimination des déchets militaires, et en particulier par les déchets déposés dans des bassins hydrauliques.


Grande-Bretagne

 
Un article de Jonathan Owen paru dans l’hebdomadaire britannique The Independent on Sunday du 22 juin 2008, sous le titre « Soldiers dumped munitions with household waste » (« Des soldats jettent des munitions avec les ordures ménagères »), rend compte d’environ 20 incidents de ce genre qui se sont produits en Grande-Bretagne, les qualifiant d’« habitude militaire dangereuse manquant cruellement de professionnalisme », passible de sanctions par le Bureau de la santé et de la sécurité (Health and Safety Executive) et l’Agence pour l’environnement (Environmental Agency). La Chambre des Communes a tenu le 20 mai 2008 une discussion sur les déchets radioactifs militaires, au cours de laquelle cette question a été examinée.


Bulgarie

 
La Bulgarie possède son programme national, adopté en 2004, pour l’utilisation et la destruction des munitions excédentaires sur son territoire. Quatre grandes sections de la législation portent également sur la question de leur utilisation.
Il y avait, en 2003, en Bulgarie, 59 000 tonnes de munitions excédentaires. Après la réforme qui a débuté en 2005 et qui visait à transformer l’armée en une armée professionnelle, ce chiffre est passé à 67 000 tonnes. Il existe actuellement en Bulgarie un plan de gestion des déchets militaires, qui devrait être pleinement mis en œuvre d’ici à 2015. Une grosse explosion de munitions excédentaires s’est produite près de Sofia le 3 juillet 2008, causant des dommages matériels mais heureusement pas de victimes.
Des explosions similaires de munitions excédentaires ont eu lieu le 15 mars 2008 dans le village de Gerdech près de Tirana en Albanie, le 17 juillet 2008 dans les entrepôts de missiles et d’artillerie près de la ville de Kagan en Ouzbékistan, le 4 septembre 2009 dans l’usine Prvi Partizan près de la ville d’Uzjice en Serbie, le 13 novembre 2009 dans les entrepôts Arsenal-31 près de la ville d’Ulianovsk en Fédération de Russie, etc. (…)
Un point peut-être encore plus important oublié dans le débat environnemental concerne les effets à long terme des matériels dangereux qui subsistent dans les pays ravagés par la guerre longtemps après le départ des forces armées. Ces incidences sur l’environnement sont souvent les plus difficiles à détecter si aucune attention particulière ne leur est accordée. étant donné que c’est à la guerre moderne que l’on doit l’utilisation des produits chimiques les plus manifestement nocifs, il existe peu d’études de cas donnant des résultats fiables sur la question.


Déchets militaires dangereux

 
Pour certaines régions d’Europe orientale, les conséquences environnementales de l’après-guerre portent sur plusieurs secteurs écologiques et constituent toujours une grave menace pour l’approvisionnement en eau, la qualité de l’air et la sécurité des populations qui y vivent. étant donné l’occupation soviétique qui a précédé, les pays concernés se retrouvent avec des bases militaires abandonnées, des armes non détectées et des déchets nocifs et radioactifs. En outre, ces problèmes sont aggravés par une réglementation laxiste. à elle seule, la Moldavie se heurte aujourd’hui à la difficulté de gérer 8 000 tonnes de déchets toxiques qui sont stockés en toute illégalité et de façon anarchique, entraînant une contamination de l’eau. Selon les chiffres à notre disposition, il y a aussi 20 000 tonnes d’armes et de munitions intransportables qui se trouvent en totalité sur le territoire de la Transnistrie. L’explosion de ces munitions provoquerait sans aucun doute une catastrophe humanitaire. En Ukraine, 2,5 millions de tonnes d’armes, de munitions et de déchets militaires sont abandonnées. Des déchets radioactifs gisent enfouis dans le sol de quatre des sites concernés. De plus, 39 % des eaux usées sont contaminées et 25 % retournent dans la nature. La Biélorussie, quant à elle, est confrontée à l’élimination des armements laissés par l’Union soviétique qui sont à la fois radioactifs et toxiques. Les pouvoirs locaux doivent maintenant nettoyer les hydrocarbures et les produits radioactifs abandonnés sur 300 000 hectares de sites militaires.


Méthodes de traitement et de stockage des déchets militaires radioactifs

 
Nombre de recommandations antérieures relatives au traitement de ces menaces environnementales ont négligé d’aborder les problèmes posés par le stockage de déchets à grande échelle. Ce processus de stockage lui-même peut aggraver les problèmes écologiques, être coûteux et inefficace.
Il n’est pas facile de recueillir des informations sur les déchets militaires en général et sur les déchets militaires radioactifs en particulier.
Pour les États-Unis, la Russie et plusieurs autres pays, il est devenu tentant d’envisager d’exporter tout simplement les déchets dangereux. Dans le cas de la Russie, la perspective de recettes futures tirées de l’importation de déchets a relégué au second plan les considérations de santé et de sécurité publiques. Moscou projette d’importer 20 milliards de tonnes de déchets radioactifs, de les stocker pendant plusieurs années, puis de les « retraiter », méthode qui n’est encore que vaguement définie. La Russie a défendu ce plan en qualifiant les déchets de matière première précieuse dont il serait possible d’extraire du plutonium pour faire fonctionner un type spécial de réacteur nucléaire. Se pose déjà un problème de plus en plus grave, à savoir le rejet à grande échelle de déchets militaires provenant de réacteurs dont le stockage dans la zone arctique de la Russie n’est toujours pas traité comme il convient. De nombreux pays du tiers monde envisagent d’importer des déchets comme source de revenus ; cependant, le déplacement des déchets ne permet pas de traiter le problème à l’échelon mondial. Pour choisir une méthode de stockage, il faut prendre en compte les incidences techniques de l’exploitation de sites de stockage et d’élimination sûrs ainsi que les questions financières liées au coût de leur sécurité, de leur déclassement, de leur décontamination et de leur dépollution.


Conclusion

 
Le problème des déchets militaires ne peut pas être traité uniquement au niveau national. C’est un problème commun à tous les pays européens. Il faut, par conséquent, mettre en place une politique et une méthodologie commune pour traiter cette question.
Il faudrait aussi étudier les possibilités de recyclage d’une partie de ces déchets militaires (notamment les métaux) vu la pénurie de ressources et la nécessité d’assurer un développement durable.
Il serait bon de mettre en place un nouvel organe européen ou international pour traiter cette question, coordonner les actions des États membres, coopérer avec les pays voisins de l’Europe pour garantir une utilisation des déchets militaires qui soit sans risque pour l’environnement et mettre en œuvre un mécanisme de contrôle. Il serait, en outre, utile que cet organe collabore avec la branche environnementale de l’OTAN et d’autres alliances militaires afin d’harmoniser les politiques et méthodes concernant l’utilisation des déchets militaires.


Notes(1) 6 août 2010. Disponible sur : http://assembly.coe.int/Documents/WorkingDocs/Doc10/FDOC12354.pdf


(2) L’Assemblée parlementaire a déjà traité cette question dans sa Résolution 1612 (2008) sur les munitions chimiques ensevelies dans la mer Baltique.


(3) STANAG = STANdardisation AGreement.


Publié dans le magazine DIPLOMATIE N°47 (novembre-décembre 2010).




Няма коментари: